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'm sorry. about his foreign policy? >> yeah. about his foreign policies. there's no real path that i see by that. where they -- where they're going with that, i guess. okay. that's a little doughy. he was spitballing a term paper. somehow the fiscal cliff got in the foreign policy. here is monday morning. it is all right. >> yeah, we just flush the lines with that one. >> stephanie: sure. a little telephone call and blow. >> yeah. >> is there something happening we should have a policy for that. >> said he was a college student so my guess is that if he's up this early he's probably still up from last night. >> stephanie: he's been up all night. things are a little doughy in there. that's okay. it is like jim -- >> give him 30 minutes. >> stephanie: last-minute ideas. curious your thoughts on -- >> stuff that happened -- [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: policy as it relates to the fiscal cliff and humanity -- >> i've been there. >> i'm feeling his pain. i've been panicky. what do i do?
, mexico, all the judicial foreign policy issues and we've moved our agenda and increasingly focusing on things domestic and what we want to do is a report on education. we don't want to repeat what everyone else has done but look at education through the prism and filter of national security and ask the question what is the relationship between the challenges of k-12 education and national security of the united states? it didn't turn out to be a terribly hard sell. she knew i had her at that point but didn't take a follow-up phone call. she was there. shea and joel cochaired the task force report, our version of the commission and the whole idea was people with disparate backgrounds, educators and national security and people don't come together in the same space and the essentially say -- raise the question about the relationship between the educational challenges we face and the national security challenges we face, to recast this issue, refrain this issue for a broader -- beyond do over. the fact that you are here reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant
there are genuine foreign policy issues and contentions needing to be resolved. is he trying to rush this through too quickly? what do we know about what the document itself will look like, and whether or not it will be one that captures the democratic principles that we hope that egypt moves forward with. >> there are loads of questions and you put your finger on many of them. let's be hopeful to suggest that this may be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i think first and for most, what kind of document emerges. how tolerant is that document, how much support there is
foreign policy. what do all three of them have in common in they'll get tea party challenges in 2014. and you know, i read the speeches that rubio and paul ryan gave tonight and they were wonderful about the need to reex out to the poor and the afflicted. and so on. but every republican who votes for any kind of revenue increase in these coming, in these coming votes, there will be facing a tea party challenge. and i suspect that that party is going to have to come to terms with that. it may take a couple more cycles to do it. >>> have the tea party challenge would not even let these guys loose to vote for the american disabilities act going worldwide. >> outrageous. it is just, it is beyond outrageous. it is the kind of crazy nut behavior that lost in this election. mitt romney might have been a more successful candidate if he had stood up to the tea party at any one point during the election. he was never outflanked to his right during the course of winning that nomination. and i think that republicans are going to have to ask themselves. especially those who want to be president.
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
in driving our nation's economy. unfortunately, current immigration policies are preventing american businesses from hiring foreign students who earn advanced degrees in approximate science, technology, engineering and mathematics from our best universities. from growing startups to u.s. multinationals, american employers are desperate for qualified stem workers no matter where they're from. microsoft, for example, has over 6,000 job openings waiting to be filled by scientists, researchers, engineers and developers. for now these openings and many others will remain vacant because too few american students are graduating with stem degrees and foreign stem graduates can't get the visas they need. every year the u.s. invests in educating thousands of foreign students in stem fields at our top universities only to send them back to compete against us. chairman lamar smith, along with congressman raul labrador, congressman bob goodlatte, and of course, the gentleman from california, mr. issa, have all worked on this and we have now put forward the measure before us to spur job creation b
our foreign policy. the chair and i both have worked for several years now trying to get the law of the sea treaty into place. it's been bouncing around for decades. but it should be more than what they call consultation. every time we talk to the executive branch -- and i am a former member of the executive branch; i spent four years in the pentagon in the reagan administration -- they say that they have consulted and the definition of a consultation should be the secretary of state calling the chairman of the foreign relations committee or the secretary of defense calling the chairman of the armed services committee or coming over for a meeting. that is not the level of discussion and involvement that the united states congress should have when we are talking about long-term commitments with countries such as afghanistan and iraq. so this amendment is not draconian. it is very sensible. it basically says that in the situation where we have entered into this proposed relationship with afghanistan, that the key committees over here in the united states congress should have 30 day
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)